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Kader Asmal Fellowship Programme 2019 is open for applications from South Africa

Kader Asmal Fellowship Programme 2019 is open for applications from South Africa

Logo of Kader Asmal Fellowship Programme

The Embassy of Ireland's Kader Asmal Fellowship Programme (KAFP) is now accepting applications for the 2019 academic year, and is open to eligible South African candidates. The programme supports students from South Africa to undertake one-year post-graduate studies in Ireland. If you would like to study for a Masters Degree in Ireland, visit the KAFP website for more information on how to apply.

The KAFP is part of Ireland’s programme of development cooperation in South Africa. The Programme aims to contribute to addressing skills shortage in South Africa, particularly among members of disadvantaged communities. Sixty six (66) students have benefitted from the programme since its inception in 2014. From 2016 the Department of Higher Education and Training started contributing financially to the Programme in order to increase the number of fellowships awarded per year to the current 17. A wide range of course subjects are covered under the programme. Read more about the students and their courses of study in the Kader Asmal Alumni Association Graduate Profiles Booklet.

Kader Asmal Fellowship recipients at National University of Ireland in Galway 2018

The Fellowship Programme is named in honour of the late Kader Asmal, and seeks to build on his strong legacy of cooperation between Ireland and South Africa. As a senior ANC member, Professor Asmal moved to Ireland in the early 1960s and lived there in exile for 27 years. He lectured in law at Trinity College Dublin, and was also the founder of the Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement and the Irish Council of Civil Liberties. These organisations inspired thousands of Irish people to campaign for an end to apartheid in South Africa, and for the protection of human rights and democracy at home and abroad. On his return to South Africa, he served as Minister for Water Affairs in the first democratic South African government and later became Minister of Education.

Through provision of one year post-graduate studies in Ireland the Programme aims to contribute to addressing skills shortage in South Africa particularly among members of disadvantaged communities. Sixty six (66) students have benefitted from the programme since its inception in 2014. From 2016 the Department of Higher Education and Training started contributing financially to the Programme in order to increase the number of fellowships awarded per year to the current 17.

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