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Minister Flanagan welcomes invitation to participate in the London Cenotaph wreath-laying ceremony

Commemorations, Minister Charles Flanagan, Press Releases, Great Britain, Europe, 2014

 

Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Charles Flanagan T.D., has welcomed today’s invitation from the British Government to Ireland to lay a wreath at the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph in London in November.

Minister Flanagan today spoke with Dr Andrew Murrison, the Prime Minister’s special representative for the Centenary Commemoration of the First World War and Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. Following his discussion with Dr. Murrison, he stated:

“One hundred years on from the start of the First World War, a war that claimed more Irish lives than any other war, I welcome the invitation for Ireland to take part in this annual wreath-laying ceremony at the Cenotaph to commemorate all those who died.

“Our participation in this solemn occasion will be an opportunity to reflect on and remember the thousands of men from the island of Ireland who, for many different reasons, left their homes and families to fight in the First World War and never returned. I am very conscious of the significance of this invitation to Ireland for the families of those who lost Irish relatives in the horrific violence of the War.”

While Ireland has previously attended the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph in London, this will be the first year of participation in the wreath-laying ceremony.

Minister Flanagan added:

“This invitation builds on the successful reciprocal State Visits of recent years and reflects the importance of this Decade of Commemorations, which marks the many significant centenary events which shaped and influenced our history between 1912 and 1922.”

 

 

ENDS

Press Office

14 October 2014