Skip to main content

Information on sanctions in respect of the situation in Ukraine

EU Guidance / FAQs:

  • The European Council information webpage on EU restrictive measures against Russia over Ukraine is available here. This provides an overview of all EU sanctions adopted in response to Russian actions in Ukraine since 2014, including a timeline.
  • European Commission guidance on sanctions adopted following Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine is available here. This webpage includes a comprehensive section on frequently asked questions, particularly regarding sanctions implementation. It is updated by the Commission on a regular basis.

Sanctions Implementation in Ireland

EU sanctions are legally binding on all natural and legal persons in Ireland and the EU. EU Council Regulations have direct effect, and must therefore be complied with in the same way as domestic Irish legislation.

Derogations to EU sanctions are provided for in the legal acts. Individuals and entities may apply under these derogations for authorisation to take actions otherwise prohibited by the sanctions. Requests for authorisations should be made to the relevant competent authority:

Sanctions Adopted on 8 April

On 8 April, the EU adopted a fifth package of sanctions In light of Russia’s continuing war of aggression against Ukraine, and the reported atrocities committed by Russian armed forces. The measures are as follows:

  • A prohibition on the import of coal and other solid fossil fuels from Russia or exported from Russia into the EU from August 2022; a prohibition on access to EU ports for Russian-flagged vessels, with certain derogations; a ban on Russian and Belarussian road transport operators transporting goods by road within the EU, with certain derogations; further export bans targeting jet fuel and other goods which might contribute to Russia’s military and technological enhancement or the development of its defence and security sector; additional import bans on products such as wood, cement and fertiliser, closing gaps between the Russia and Belarus sanctions regimes; and a series of further targeted economic measures intended to strengthen existing sanctions and close loopholes, including measures related to public procurement, financial support to Russian public bodies, crypto-wallets, and the sale of banknotes and transferrable securities. These measures are imposed in addition to the existing sectoral measures initially adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.
  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze is applied to an additional 217 individuals, including high-ranking Kremlin officials, oligarchs, propagandists and the family members of already-sanctioned individuals, including President Putin’s two daughters. An asset freeze is also applied to 18 entities, including four major banks and companies active in the military-defence industry. These measures are imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine. A total of 1,091 individuals and 80 entities have now been listed under this sanctions regime since 2014.

Further information on these sanctions is available here (sectoral measures) and here (individual measures).

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 15 March

On 15 March, the EU adopted a new sanctions package comprising sectoral and individual measures, as follows:

  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze is applied to an additional 15 individuals and nine entities supporting and benefitting from the Russian Government, or providing a substantial source of revenue to it, or associated with listed persons or entities. These measures are imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine. A total of 877 people and 62 entities have now been listed under this sanctions regime since 2014.
  • New measures prohibit all transactions with certain Russian state-owned companies, as well as prohibiting the provision of credit rating services and related subscription services to Russian persons or entities. The measures tighten export restrictions on dual-use goods and technology, as well as goods and technology that might contribute to the technological enhancement of Russia’s defence and security sector, and expand the list of persons subject to these restrictions. New investments in the Russian energy sector are prohibited, and comprehensive export restrictions are imposed on related equipment, technology and services, with the exception of the nuclear industry and downstream energy transport. An import ban applies to iron and steel products from Russia, and an export ban applies to a wide range of luxury goods. These measures are imposed in addition to the existing sectoral measures initially adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.

Further information on these sanctions is available here (sectoral measures) and here (individual measures).

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 9 March

On 9 March, the EU adopted further sanctions, expanding on and clarifying existing sanctions concerning Russia and Belarus. The measures are as follows:

  • Further restrictions on the export of maritime navigation goods and technology, and an extension of the list of legal persons, entities and bodies subject to the prohibitions related to investment services, transferable securities, money market instruments, and loans. Clarifications are also made in the new legal acts, including that the notion of “transferable securities” includes crypto-assets, to ensure the proper application of some of the specific sectoral restrictions. These measures are imposed in addition to the existing sectoral measures initially adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.
  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze is applied to an additional 146 members of the Russian Federation Council who ratified the government decisions of the ‘Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance’ between Russia and the two break-away regions in Donetsk and Luhansk, as well as to an additional 14 persons supporting and benefitting from the Russian Government or providing a substantial source of revenue to it, or associated with listed persons or entities (160 individuals in total). These measures are imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine.
  • Restrictions in the financial sector in Belarus, including a prohibition on the listing and provision of services in relation to shares of Belarusian state-owned entities on Union trading venues; limitations on the financial inflows from Belarus to the Union by prohibiting the acceptance of deposits exceeding certain values from Belarusian nationals or residents, the holding of accounts of Belarusian clients by the Union central securities depositories, as well as the selling of euro-denominated securities to Belarusian clients; a prohibition on transactions with the Central Bank of Belarus related to the management of reserves or assets, the provision of public financing for trade with and investment in Belarus (with limited exceptions), and the provision of euro denominated banknotes to Belarus; and restriction of the provision of specialised financial messaging services to three Belarusian credit institutions and their Belarusian subsidiaries (i.e., exclusion from SWIFT). The new measures also introduce additional obligations on the Network Manager for air traffic management network functions of the single European sky regarding overflight prohibitions, and introduce some clarifications to existing measures, including that the notion of “transferable securities” includes crypto-assets. These measures are in addition to existing restrictive measures in respect of Belarus.

Further information on these sanctions is available here (Belarussian financial measures and updates to sanctions in view of Russia’s actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine) and here (additional listings).

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 1-2 March

On 1-2 March, the EU adopted further sanctions. The measures relate to the Russian financial sector and disinformation, and also impose sanctions on Belarussian figures, as well as limiting trade between the EU and Belarus:

  • The measures prohibit the provision of specialised financial messaging services, which are used to exchange financial data, to seven Russian banks. The measures also prohibit the sale, supply, transfer or export of euro-denominated banknotes to Russia or to any natural or legal person, entity or body in Russia, including the government and the Central Bank of Russia, or for use in Russia, and prohibit investment in, participation in or other contributions to projects co-financed by the Russian Direct Investment Fund. Certain exceptions and derogations may apply. These measures are imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.
  • The measures suspend the broadcasting activities of certain media outlets (Russia Today (RT) and Sputnik) in the EU, or directed at the EU, until the aggression against Ukraine is put to an end, and until the Russian Federation, and its associated media outlets, cease to conduct propaganda actions against the Union and its Member States. Consistent with the fundamental rights and freedoms recognised in the Charter of Fundamental Rights, in particular with the right to freedom of expression and information, the freedom to conduct a business and the right to property, these measures do not prevent those media outlets and their staff from carrying out other activities in the Union than broadcasting, such as research and interviews. These measures are also imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine.
  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze is applied to an additional 22 persons associated with the Belarussian military and Ministry for Defence. These measures are imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine.
  • The measures introduce further restrictions on trade between the EU and Belarus, relating to the trade of goods used for the production or manufacturing of tobacco products, mineral fuels, bituminous substances and gaseous hydrocarbon products, potassium chloride (“potash”) products, wood products, cement products, iron and steel products and rubber products. Further restrictions are also introduced on exports of dual-use goods and technology and related services, as well as restrictions on exports of certain goods and technology which might contribute to Belarus’ military, technological, defence and security development, together with restrictions on related services. These measures are in addition to existing restrictive measures in respect of Belarus

Further information on these sanctions is available here (financial measures), here (disinformation), and here (Belarus listings and sectoral measures).

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 28 February

On 28 February, the EU adopted further sanctions. The measures relate to aviation and finance, as well as additional individual listings:

  • The measures prohibit any transactions with the Central Bank of Russia in Europe. These measures are imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.
  • Member States are also required to deny permission to land in, take off from, or overfly, their territories to any aircraft operated by Russian air carriers, including as a marketing carrier, to any Russian-registered aircraft, and to non-Russian-registered aircraft which are owned or chartered, or otherwise controlled by a Russian legal or natural person, with certain exceptions and derogations. These measures are also imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine.
  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze is applied to an additional 26 individuals including oligarchs, bankers, businesspeople, ministers and politicians, figures involved in disinformation and military leaders, as well as an asset freeze on one entity, which insured projects related to annexed Crimea. These measures are imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine.

Further information on these sanctions is available here (aviation and finance) and here (individual listings).

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 25 February 2022

On 25 February, the EU adopted further sanctions in response to Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine. The individual and economic restrictive measures are as follows:

  • Expansion of existing financial restrictions, in particular access by certain Russian entities to EU capital markets. The measures prohibit the listing and provision of services in relation to shares of Russian state-owned entities on EU trading venues. They limits financial inflows from Russia to the EU, by prohibiting the acceptance of deposits exceeding €100,000 from Russian nationals or residents, the holding of accounts of Russian clients by Union central securities depositories, and the selling of euro-denominated securities to Russian clients. These measures are imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine, thus expanding this sanctions regime.
  • Further restrictions on exports of dual-use goods and technology and on the provision of related services, as well as restrictions on exports of certain goods and technology that might contribute to Russia’s enhancement of its defence and security sector, and related services. The provision of public financing or financial assistance for trade with, or investment in, Russia is also prohibited. These measures are also imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine.
  • Restrictions on the sale, supply, transfer or export to Russia of specific goods and technologies for use in oil refining and restrictions on related services. These measures are also imposed in addition to the sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine.
  • An export ban covering goods and technology suited for use in aviation and space industry, and prohibiting the provision of related insurance, reinsurance and maintenance services. The provision of technical assistance, related services, financing or financial assistance related to these goods and technologies is also prohibited.
  • The designation criteria in the sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine are amended to include persons and entities supporting and benefitting from the Government of the Russian Federation, as well as persons and entities providing a substantial source of revenue to it.
  • New listings are also adopted, including: Vladimir Putin, President of the Russian Federation, Sergey Lavrov, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, members of the Russian National Security Council who supported recognition of the two self-proclaimed republics; the remaining members of the State Duma who ratified the government decisions of the Treaties of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance between the Russian Federation and the self-proclaimed republics, and 20 individuals who facilitated the Russian military aggression from Belarus.

Further information regarding these sanctions is available here.

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

Sanctions Adopted on 23 February

On 23 February, the EU adopted sanctions in response to Russian recognition of the non-government controlled areas in Donetsk and Luhansk, Ukraine, and the decision to send Russian troops into the region. The measures are as follows:

  • An EU travel ban and asset freeze, extended to all 351 members of the Russian State Duma who voted in favour of the recognition of the break-away regions. These measures also apply to 22 individuals, including members of the Russian Government and other decision makers involved in the illegal actions, businesspeople and oligarchs who financially or materially supported the military operations or benefitted from them, military officers who played a role in the invasion and related destabilisation actions, and those involved in disinformation. An asset freeze was also applied to four entities, including three private banks and an entity responsible for disinformation. These measures were imposed under the existing sanctions regime in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine
  • The measures also target the ability of the Russian State and Government to access the EU’s capital and financial markets and services. This limits Russia’s ability to finance further escalatory and aggressive policies and actions. These measures were imposed along with other sectoral measures adopted in 2014 in view of Russia's actions destabilising the situation in Ukraine.
  • Mirroring the restrictive measures introduced in response to the illegal annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol, a number of new measures targeted economic relations between the EU and the two breakaway regions. These include an import ban on goods from the non-government controlled areas of Donetsk and Luhansk, restrictions on trade and investments related to certain economic sectors, a prohibition to supply tourism services, and an export ban for certain goods and technologies.

Further information regarding these sanctions is available here.

A summary of the sanctions measures with links to the relevant legal acts is available here. Please note that this is a summary overview only. The full legal acts should be consulted in all cases.

| Next Item »