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Visas for Ireland

If you want to enter Ireland, you may need a visa. We will guide you through the application process. Many common questions are answered in frequently asked questions. In Ireland, the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) is primarily responsible for dealing with immigration and visa matters and you will find extended and detailed visa advice on their site.

Who needs a Visa?

Whether you need a visa to enter Ireland depends on what country you’re from. Check if you need a visa.

Schedule 3 - Visa waiver programme

If you’re a citizen of one of these countries and you meet Visa Waiver Programme requirements, you may be able to travel on to Ireland from the UK without the need to obtain a separate Irish visa. If not, you’ll need to apply for an entry visa before you travel to Ireland.

Learn more about the programme on the INIS website.

How to Apply

Submitting your application

You need to:

  • Complete the online application form
  • Gather your supporting documentation, passport photograph and fee
  • The online application system will automatically request you to submit your documentation to:
Visa Office,
Embassy of Ireland,
SHIS QL 12 Conjunto 05, casa 09 Lago Sul,
Brasília, DF,
CEP: 71630-255

Processing Times

The processing times for visa applications vary depending on the visa type and the Office to which the application is lodged. Visa applications are considered in as speedy a manner as possible. Timeframes for decision can be dependent on a number of factors including, the number of applications received and the resources available to process them at any one time. While the vast majority of applications are dealt with within a much shorter timeframe, it is recommended that applicants allow as much time as possible when applying for a visa. Just in case further enquiries have to be made, we advise you to apply for your visa 8 weeks before the date you plan to travel.

NOTE: The long term or permanent nature of the intended stay in Ireland, in the case of join family visa applications, means they will require more in-depth consideration than short-stay visa applications and it is recommended applicants make their applications 12 weeks prior to their proposed dates of travel.

Following the online application

Once I have applied online, what do I do?

    1. Refer to the checklists and the Types of Visa and Documentation tab of this website to ensure that you have all of the documents required to support your application.
    2. Check the Visa Fees tab to find out about the current visa fees.
    3. Check the Photo Requirements page to ensure that you are providing an appropriate photo.
    4. Once you have checked all of the above, submit your application to the address given by the system.

 

The application must include:

  • The online summary sheet signed by you
  • One passport photograph affixed to the top left of your application form
  • Current passport and any previous passports (or certified copies of previous passports if originals are unavailable)
  • All required supporting documents
  • The visa fee (if required)

Notification

We will contact you once a decision has been made.

Need more information?

Visit the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) website to find out what you need to know before you apply for a visa.

What sort of Visa do I need?

A comprehensive list of the different visa types that are available, and the documentation required in respect of each, is available from the INIS website.

Fees

Please note that BRL fees for visas are regularly updated to keep in line with the Euro fees.

Standard non-refundable visa application processing fees are:

  • Single Journey Visa: BRL210/€60
  • Multi Journey Visa: BRL350/€100
  • Transit Visa: BRL88/€25

No fee required

Some applicants don't have to pay a fee for their visa. These include visa-required spouses and certain family members of EEA citizens (including Irish nationals). You must provide proof of the relationship with the application. Holders of EU family cards are also exempt from payment. More details can be found here.

Payment method

Payment can be made by cheque payable to Embassy of Ireland or bank draft, please contact us and we will issue a “boleto”.

Once a visa application is lodged for processing, the processing fee cannot be refunded.

Visa Appeals

My application has been refused

If your application has been refused and you still want to travel to Ireland, you can:

  • Appeal the decision or
  • Make a new application

If you decide to make a new application, your previous application history may be taken into account.

Appealing the decision

You'll be sent a letter outlining the reasons for refusal. If you believe the decision is wrong, you can make an appeal within two months of receiving the refusal notice.

How do I make an appeal?

Your appeal must be made in writing to the address specified in the letter you have received. Appeals may only be lodged by you (or your guardian if a minor) and must be signed by you. Faxed or emailed appeals will not be considered.

You should:

  • Address each refusal reason in your appeal
  • Supply clear and relevant evidence in your appeal to support your application
  • Include any further information or documentation with your appeal letter
  • Be aware that provision of the additional information/documentation doesn't guarantee approval

The review

The Appeals Officer will review your application, taking account of any additional information or documentation that you have supplied.

On examination and review the original decision may be reversed. The Appeals Officer will notify you in writing when the decision is made and in general, a decision should issue within 4-6 weeks.

Is there a charge?

There is no charge for lodging an appeal.

On Arrival in Ireland

Immigration control

An Irish visa is not an entry permission. It's a document giving you permission to present at a port of entry to ask to be admitted to Ireland.

All non-EEA citizens, whether they need a visa or not, will be subject to ordinary immigration controls at the port of entry.

Additional documents

As well as your visa, an Immigration Officer may ask to see additional information such as:

  • Accommodation bookings
  • Return flights
  • Contacts in Ireland

Length of stay

The Immigration Officer at the port of entry will decide your length of stay by stamping your passport; which will reflect the purpose of your journey and the amount of time you are allowed to stay in the State.

The validity period shown on your visa indicates the dates between which you must travel to Ireland. These dates are NOT the dates between which you're permitted to remain in Ireland.

Staying over three months

If you need a visa to enter Ireland and you want to stay longer than 90 days, apply for a 'D' type visa before you travel. Permission to enter on the basis of a 'C' type visa will not give you permission to remain beyond a 90 day period.

Registration

If you're a non-EEA national and you want to stay longer than three months in Ireland, you must register with the Garda National Immigration Bureau and apply for permission to remain in Ireland.

Conditions of your visa

Under Irish law, you're not allowed to engage in any activity or to remain in Ireland for any purpose other than that for which your visa or permission to remain was granted.

Overstaying your visa

If you stay in Ireland longer than your permission to remain permits, you could be liable for prosecution and/or deportation.

Change of activity

If you want to undertake any activity in Ireland other than that for which your visa was granted you must leave the country and apply for a new visa. You can’t return to Ireland while you're waiting for a decision on your new application.

Remember...

If you’re a citizen of a non-EU country, whether you need a visa or not, you will be subject to immigration control when you enter Ireland.