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Overview

Authenticating a document verifies its origin by confirming that a signature, seal or stamp appearing on a document is genuine.

When would I need a document authenticated?

If you are going to use Irish documents overseas, for business or personal reasons, you may need to have them authenticated by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

This Department cannot advise on whether a document needs to be authenticated. This is a matter for the authorities in the country in which the document is to be used.

Who can authenticate documents?

In Ireland

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade can only authenticate documents executed in Ireland that will be used in other countries. 

All documents must either be created in Ireland or show an Irish connection. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade reserves the right to refuse to authenticate any documents which we deem not to have an appropriate Irish link.

In the case of sworn documents, the person swearing the document before an Irish Notary Public or Solicitor must be resident in Ireland.

Solicitors, please note that documents signed in the name of the firm as opposed to the name of the solicitor signing the document will not be authenticated.

Copies of foreign Identification documents can only be authenticated if they have already been verified by the Embassy of that country accredited to Ireland.

All documents to be authenticated should bear an original signature, seal or stamp from an Irish practising public official or organisations.

Remember...

Authenticating a document doesn't mean that the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is verifying that its contents are accurate or that the Department approves of its contents.