Cookies on the DFA website

We use cookies to give the best experience on our site while also complying with Data Protection requirements. Continue without changing your settings, and you'll receive cookies, or change your cookie settings at any time.

Skip to main content

Moving to the Republic of Korea (South Korea)

If you are moving to South Korea or have recently moved to South Korea, it can take some time to adapt to your new surroundings. Please refer to following information and useful links which might help you adapting yourself to the new surroundings.

Registering with the Embassy while in Korea

If you are an Irish citizen and a member of a family of an Irish citizen (including a foreign-born spouse or foreign-born child of the Irish citizen), please consider registering with the Embassy. It allows us to send you information from time to time which you might find useful. It is also a good way to ensure that information during an emergency can be conveyed quickly and efficiently. Your contact details are treated as confidential and are not shared with any authorities.

If you wish to register while you are resident in or visiting South Korea, you may do so by completing the online registration form.

1345 Immigration Contact Centre

Irish nationals seeking information about where/how to apply for or renew Korean working visas should contact the nearest Korean Embassy where they are currently residing, if they do not live in Korea. In the event they are already residing in Korea, they should contact a branch office of the Korean Immigration Service in their region, or contact the 1345 Immigration Contact Centre. Multilingual visa & immigration information services to expatriates in Korea are provided by the Korean e-Government for Foreigners.

Social Security Agreement between Ireland and Korea

On Thursday 1 January, 2009 an agreement between Ireland and the Republic of Korea came into effect. Its purpose is to enable persons who have paid social insurance in both countries, but have too few contributions in one country for a pension, to receive a pension on the basis of their combined periods of social insurance contributions.

It also allows a person to retain cover under their home country's legislation if they are sent to work temporarily for the same employer or a subsidiary company in the other country for a period of up to 5 years.

Please see the information leaflet for additional information. The relevant agency in Republic of Korea is the National Pension Service and in Ireland it is the Department of Social Protection.

Double Taxation Agreement between Ireland and RoK

Ireland and the Republic of Korea (South Korea) signed, in Dublin, on 18 July, 1990 a Convention for the avoidance of Double Taxation and the prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and Capital Gains.

The Convention or Double Taxation Agreement provides for the allocation of taxing rights between the two countries and for the granting of relief from double taxation with regard to items of income and capital gains which, under the laws of both countries, may be taxed in both.

If you have detailed questions then you should seek expert professional advice.

USEFUL LINKS

Irish Organisations and Societies

You may find it helpful to meet with other Irish citizens who are part of a local organisation or business network. There are a small number of Irish organisations and societies in South Korea:

Travel to Korea:

Study in Korea:

Work and Live in Korea:

Business and Economy in Korea:

For further information

For further information on working, especially Teaching English in Korea, please see ‘Advice and Assistance’ page of this website