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Guinea

If you’re travelling to Guinea our travel advice and updates give you practical tips and useful information. 

Security Status

  • Normal precautions
  • High degree of caution
  • Avoid non-essential travel
  • Do not travel
  • Overview
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws and Customs
  • Health
  • Additional Information
  • Embassy Contact

Overview

General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation

For the latest update please read the General COVID-19 Travel Advisory >

Overview

Security Status

High degree of caution.

Latest Travel Alert

Citizens planning travel abroad should take into account the ongoing risk of testing positive for COVID-19 while abroad and are advised to take out comprehensive travel insurance that includes COVID-19 cover. Before departure and during travel, citizens are advised to monitor our Travel Advice, follow us on Twitter, and register with their nearest Irish Embassy or Consulate.

The availability and quality of medical services in Guinea is poor. Citizens should be aware that they may have difficulty accessing even basic medical services, particularly in remote areas.

Following a coup in Guinea on 5 September 2021, a transitional government is in place. The situation is evolving and you should remain vigilant, avoid demonstrations, and monitor local media. 

It is strongly recommended that Irish citizens travelling to or in Guinea register with our Embassy in Sierra Leone.

Travel to Guinea

Fully vaccinated travellers entering or leaving Guinea are not required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 (PCR) test result.

Guinea’s Ministry of Health accepts the following vaccines:

  • Johnson & Johnson, at least 28 days before travel
  • Astrazeneca, with an interval of 8-12 weeks between doses, and at least 14 days after the second dose
  • Pfizer, with an interval of 3 weeks between doses, and at least 14 days after the second dose
  • Moderna, with an interval of 3-7 weeks between doses, and at least 14 days after the second dose
  • Sinopharm and Sinovac, with an interval of 3 weeks between doses, and at least 14 days after the second dose
  • Sputnik V, with an interval of 8-12 weeks between doses, and at least 14 days after the second dose

All travellers aged 6 and over who have not received the vaccine or are partially vaccinated are required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 (PCR) test taken within 72 hours of entering or leaving Guinea.

There are no specific requirements for transiting through Guinea.

Visas

All Irish nationals need a visa to enter or live in Guinea. You can apply for visas for both private and business travel and residency at the Embassy of the Republic of Guinea in London and on the Guinea Online Visa Portal.

Applications for visas must include a COVID-19 certificate of vaccination, if you have received the following vaccines: Pfizer, Sputnik, Sinopharm, Astra Zeneca or Johnson & Johnson. The application must include proof of two COVID-19 vaccination doses completed at least 15 days before you plan to travel.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

A Yellow Fever certificate is required to enter the country.

Safety and Security

Safety and Security

Political Situation

A coup took place in Guinea on 5 September 2021 and an interim government is in place. The situation is evolving and you should remain vigilant avoid demonstrations, and monitor local media.

Political tensions are high. Public gatherings and demonstrations can be called with little or no notice and can quickly turn violent. You should avoid large demonstrations or rallies (both political and non-political), particularly those close to military barracks and regularly monitor local and international media reports.

It is strongly recommended that Irish citizens travelling in Guinea register with our Embassy in Sierra Leone.

Crime

For assistance or to report a crime, the local police number for downtown Conakry is +224 622 039 258.

Motorists have encountered theft at gun point, particularly at night. These crimes are often carried out by individuals dressed in police or military uniforms and carrying military weapons. There have been incidents of violent car-jackings, especially in the outlying suburbs of Conakry. Burglaries and break-ins are common.

There are regular reports of robberies on the roads to Mamou, Faranah, Kissidougou, Guékédou, Macenta, N’zérékoré.

Terrorism

There is a global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks which can target areas frequented by foreign tourists.

Transport

The roads in Guinea are hazardous, particularly during the rainy season from May to October. If you are planning to drive, you should plan your route before any journey, particularly outside of Conakry, and you should avoid travelling outside of cities at night. Carry your Irish driving licence and International Driving Permit at all times.

Taxis and long distance buses are poorly maintained, and the drivers often unqualified. Few motorists have any form of insurance. Most major hotels and travel agencies offer cars for hire, with a chauffeur if required.

The standard of road maintenance is low. Beware of deep potholes. Many roads are not metalled and are not repaired after the rainy season. Roads within Conakry and other principal towns can quickly become flooded and impassable.  

Emergency Assistance

If there is an emergency, or if you need help and advice, you can contact our Consular Assistance Unit at the Department of Foreign Affairs in Dublin on +353 1 408 2000.

As there is no Irish Embassy or Consulate in Guinea, we are limited in the help we can offer in an emergency. The best help is often close at hand so if you have problems, try talking to your local contacts, tour operator representative or hotel management.

Under the EU Consular Protection Directive, Irish nationals may seek assistance from the Embassy or Consulate of any other EU member state in a country where there is no Irish Embassy or permanent representation. Contact details for EU member state embassies in Guinea may be found here.

Local Laws and Customs

Local laws and customs

Remember, the local laws apply to you as a visitor and it is your responsibility to follow them. Be sensitive to local customs, traditions and practices as your behaviour may be seen as improper, hostile or may even be illegal.

As Ireland does not have an Embassy or Consulate in Guinea, we are limited in our ability to provide up-to-date information on local laws and customs in Guinea. We advise Irish citizens to seek advice on this from their employer, tour operator or other local contacts.

Health

Health

The availability and quality of medical services in Guinea is poor. Citizens should be aware that you may have difficulty accessing even basic medical services, particularly in remote areas.

If you have a pre-existing medical condition or underlying health concerns, you should note that it may not be possible to get appropriate drugs or treatment during your stay.

If you choose to travel, bring enough medication with you for the duration of your visit and for any unexpected delays. You may wish to also bring copies of your prescription in case you lose your medication.

Tropical illnesses are extremely common in Guinea. If you develop fever, unexplained fatigue, diarrhoea or any other severe symptoms while in Guinea, or in the weeks following your departure from Guinea, you should telephone your GP or Accident and Emergency Department mentioning your symptoms and your travel history; you may require immediate investigation and treatment.

Travel Insurance

Before travelling, the Department strongly recommends that you obtain comprehensive travel insurance which will cover all overseas medical costs, including medical repatriation/evacuation, repatriation of remains and legal costs. You should check any exclusions and, in particular, that your policy covers you for the activities you want to undertake.

Vaccinations

Check what vaccinations you may need for your trip at least eight weeks before you travel. We cannot provide advice on vaccinations, but you can get information about vaccinations from your local GP or an International Health and Travel Centre.

Evidence of vaccination (in the form of a certificate) is a requirement for entry to some countries. A yellow fever vaccine certificate is typically required for entry into countries in West Africa. 

Ebola, Lassa Fever and the Marburg Virus

Ebola and Lassa fever are acute viral haemorrhagic fever illnesses transmitted to humans via contact with contaminated food or household items; or through contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person.

On February 2021, there was confirmation of a new outbreak of Ebola in the Nzerekore region of Guinea. Following a 42 day countdown, on 19 June 2021 the Ministry of Health declared an end to this Ebola epidemic. The last Ebola epidemic ended in June 2016.

Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa; outbreaks are common. 

Further information on Ebola and Lassa fever are available from the WHO Website.

On 15 September 2021, Guinea declared an end to the Marburg Virus Disease outbreak that was first confirmed on 6 August 2021 in Guekédou, Forestiére Region. You can find more information on Marburg virus disease from the World Health Organisation.

The Ministry of Health announced on 7 June 2022 the presence of Bird flu in the Forecariah and Coyah following results from a laboratory in Italy.

We advise Irish citizens working in medical facilities or caring for sick people in Guinea to take particular care and seek expert advice on infection prevention.

If you develop fever, unexplained fatigue, diarrhoea or any other severe symptoms while in Guinea, or in the weeks following your departure, you should telephone your GP or Accident and Emergency Department mentioning your symptoms and your travel history; you may require immediate investigation and treatment.

Additional Information

Additional Information

Passports

It’s advisable to take a number of photocopies of your passport with you when travelling to Guinea and you should carry a photocopy of your passport at all times during your stay.

If your passport is lost or stolen while you’re abroad, we can help.

What we can do:

  • Issue you a replacement passport that will let you finish your trip, or;
  • Issue you with an emergency travel document to get you home.

We’ll do our best to help you as quickly as possible but this can take some time. Your location and circumstances may limit the help we can give you. As Ireland does not have an Embassy or Consulate in Guinea there may be additional complications in processing an application for a new passport.

You should contact the Irish Embassy in Sierra Leone to find out what you need to do to apply for a passport. They will also be able to advise you on the fees which apply.

Our advice

Ireland doesn’t have an Embassy or Consulate in Guinea so we are limited in our ability to provide detailed and up-to-date travel advice. We encourage you to conduct your own research and to read these links to travel advice from other foreign ministries:

Embassy contact

Embassy Contact

Irish citizens who require urgent assistance while the Embassy is closed can contact the Duty Officer at the Department of Foreign Affairs on +353 1 408 2000.

Embassy of Ireland,
8 St Joseph's Avenue,
Off Spur Road,
Freetown,
Sierra Leone

Tel: +232 79 250628

Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm; Friday 9am to 12pm

Contact us